Pharmacy Supply

Apothecary Products designs and produces solutions that allow pharmacists to work with ease and efficiency. From pharmacy supplies like graduates and medicine bottles to innovative medication management products, we create tools and aids that are functional and smart.

Our Ezy Dose®Amber Ovals meet the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) standards for child-resistant and senior-friendly closures and the bottle adapters allow syringes to easily withdraw liquid medication.

Our Ezy Dose®plastic ointment jars are perfect for packaging and mailing a variety of ointments and creams. The write-on lids make labeling expiration dates easy to see.

Apothecary Products has pill counting trays, spatulas, safety goggles, gloves, thermometers, scales, labels, shelf dividers, stickers and more.

From syringes to spoons to medicine droppers, we have an array of calibrated liquid dosing aids. Some come in different colors while others include custom imprinting options.

We make it easy to get the right dose to the right customer every time. This cold seal blister pack is easy to fill. The starter kit comes with 100 cards, 100 blisters, roller and sealing tray.

There are a variety of blister card sizes to meet different dosage requirements. Simply load tray, insert pills, peel to reveal adhesive and seal card for your customers. Watch the video to learn more.

Innovation Lab Rolls Out Elevating Arm Sling Across Pharmacy Locations: Part of Strategy to Deliver Better Health Outcomes

Area Company Shows How Inclusion drives Innovation

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Medication Without Harm Real-life stories

The World Health Assembly took place on 2126 May 2018.

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Medication Without Harm: Real-life stories

Dora, a 79-year-old woman, developed distressing symptoms including uncontrollable shaking, head bobbing, and tongue darting in and out of her mouth. A lady who really liked her daily trip into town found herself housebound and wondering what was to be her fate.

Doras daughter took her to the general practitioner who said sympathetically that this was Parkinsons disease and there was nothing to be done. In the course of the conversation, the doctor mentioned that the only Parkinsons she had ever seen alleviated was drug-induced.

Upon returning home, Doras daughter happened to glance at her mothers long list of medications and had a moment of inspiration. She returned to the doctor and asked, Considering the number of drugs she is on, is there any possibility this might be drug-induced Parkinsons?. The doctor said the only way to find out was to take her mother off the medications.

Unaware that it can be risky to remove patients abruptly from their medications, Doras daughter stopped all her mothers medications without further consultation. Fortunately for Dora, no permanent harm was done. After a week of withdrawal symptoms, including hallucinations and disordered thinking, all Parkinsons symptoms disappeared, never to return. Dora was able to resume her usual daily trip to town and return to an independent life.

Taking a large number of drugs without regular medication reviews can have a devastating impact on quality of life and patient safety, especially in older people. Patients and families should make a practice of routinely going over the need for all medications with their health care providers and should be cautious about trying to stop medications without medical supervision.

*The names and photos used in this story are not real, but the story is based on true events.

Mr Amin – Inappropriate prescribing of high-risk drugs

Mr Amin was a cheerful 65-year-old retiree with diabetes and high blood pressure. One morning his son found him unconscious and rushed him to the hospital. At the emergency department, tests showed high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high blood sugar, reduced kidney function, and high uric acid. After a short hospital stay, Mr Amin was sent home with prescriptions for insulin, a cholesterol medicine, and four types of blood pressure medicine. The high uric acid, which is sometimes but not always associated with gout, was not treated.

Not long afterward, Mr. Amin went for a follow-up visit at his regular primary care centre. Because Mr Amins uric acid level had not gone down, the primary care practitioner gave him a prescription for allopurinol, a powerful drug that reduces uric acid. Mr Amin soon developed a severe skin rash, which rapidly became worse. His family took him back to the emergency department, where he was diagnosed with Stevens Johnson Syndrome. Stevens Johnson Syndrome is a dangerous condition in which the upper layers of the skin and mucous membranes peel off. It is a known and feared side effect of the drug allopurinol. Mr Amin died in the hospital a few days later.

While allopurinol is the drug of choice for lowering uric acid in gout, the risk of Stevens Johnson Syndrome and other rare but serious drug reactions cannot be ignored. Clinical practice guidelines in Mr Amins country advise against using allopurinol in patients like Mr Amin, who have no external signs of gout. Furthermore, patients taking high-risk drugs like allopurinol should be told what to do if they have a reaction. This did not happen in the case of Mr Amin, who believed he had chicken pox and did not know to stop taking the drug.

*The names and photos used in this story are not real, but the story is based on true events.

Eight-year-old Buddy was a lively boy with a beautiful laugh. Because of a sleep disorder, he took medicine every night to help keep his sleep cycle regulated. One night his mother gave him his medicine as usual and put him to bed. When his father went to wake him in the morning, Buddy was dead. Medics told Buddys parents that their child had been dead for hours. Months later, an investigation by the coroner revealed that instead of his usual medicine, L-tryptophan, Buddy had toxic amounts of a powerful muscle relaxant drug called Baclofen in his system. Buddy had died from a medication mix-up.

Upon analyzing the medicine remaining from Buddys prescription, the coroner found that the amount of medicine was precisely the amount required to produce the L-tryptophan mixture but it was the wrong drug. Someone in the lab had mistakenly used Baclofen powder instead of L-tryptophan powder. The resulting liquid contained enough Baclofen to kill an adult, but it looked and apparently tasted the same as the L-tryptophan mixture. Once the mistake was made, it was impossible to tell the difference.

Buddys parents have begun a campaign to require reporting of medication errors to a database in the province they live in, and they hope that other provinces will follow suit. While pharmacy errors are believed to be rare in their high-income country, the actual number and type are not known because only one province now has such a requirement. I think that when there is transparency, training can happen, review of policy and procedures can happen, intervention can happen, Buddys mother said. Nothing can bring Buddy back to us. However, in his caring spirit we want the laws to protect all people, she concluded.

A woman took her 88-year-old mother, Naila, to the doctor. Naila had fractured her back six weeks earlier, and oxycodone had been added to the more than 10 other drugs she was already taking. Naila and her daughter were pleased that Nailas back now appeared to be healed. To their surprise, the doctor did not propose discontinuing the oxycodone, but instead said she would place Naila on a pain management plan, as she was on so many medications. Nailas daughter questioned this, as the oxycodone had originally been prescribed as a six-week course, and Naila no longer seemed to be in pain.

Nailas daughter asked the doctor to review her mothers medications before making any decisions. Starting at the top of the list, she asked the doctor the name of the first drug and the reason it was prescribed. Then she turned to her mother and asked if she still had that medical problem. Her mother said no. The doctor removed the drug from the prescription list.

Together the three of them went through the list, one drug at a time. As they went over each medication, they discovered that it was no longer needed and the doctor removed it. In the end only one drug was left. Naila now takes one drug daily and is very healthy.

Nailas daughter asked her mother why she kept taking the drugs after she no longer had the conditions for which they had been prescribed. Naila said she continued to take them because the doctor continued prescribing them.

It is easy for a patient to build up a long list of drugs even after they no longer have a reason to take them. A regular medication review is an essential part of good practice for preventing unneeded treatment and potential harm.

Martha – Communication between doctors and patients

Martha, the eldest in a family of five children, had low levels of potassium in her blood. This condition had been managed for years by giving her extra potassium.

Then, as a young nursing student, Martha developed mood swings that were diagnosed as bipolar disorder. She was prescribed lithium. Martha and her mother researched the drug and concluded it was safe. Martha had not been told, however, that recent tests indicated she had a congenital heart defect, or that a warning had been put in her medical file advising against prescribing lithium. She did not know that giving lithium to someone with low potassium can affect the heart.

As Martha began taking lithium her moods became more stable, but she started having spells of racing heartbeat. A doctor dismissed these symptoms as panic attacks and her lithium dose was increased.

Two weeks later, her father found her lying on the floor beside her bed where she had died during the night. She had not been able to get to the bedroom door to call for help.

Martha was just 22 when she suffered a fatal cardiac arrhythmia. Marthas parents scoured her medical records to piece together the events that had led to their daughters death. They learned that a psychiatrist, knowing of Marthas low potassium, had written the lithium warning in her chart. But a more junior doctor ignored the warning and prescribed the drug without mentioning the concern to Martha. They also discovered that tests had confirmed Marthas heart defect a year before she died. The heart doctor had never read the tests because it was his practice to wait for the patients return visit before reading the tests. Assuming that no news is good news, Martha had not made a follow-up appointment.

A coroners investigation later confirmed that Martha had died of an adverse drug reaction, and that the heart defect, had it been communicated, would have been reason not to prescribe lithium.

Poor communication among doctors and between doctors and patients is a common cause of medication errors. Patients should be informed of all potential complications before starting drug therapy.

*The name, photograph and contents of this story are true, published with permission from the family.

A couple took their two-week-old baby girl, Zoya, for a routine check-up. The paediatrician ordered two injections of vitamin K. At the clinic pharmacy, Zoyas father was given two vials of medicine to take to the nurse for the injection. The paediatrician was on the telephone, but made a hand gesture to the nurse to indicate just one injection. The nurse gave the baby one injection and returned the second vial of medicine to the parents.

The baby cried loudly and continued to cry after the parents put her in the car. When she suddenly stopped crying, her parents realized she was no longer breathing. They turned the car around and raced back to the clinic. The father took Zoya in his arms and ran into the clinic, where the staff immediately began CPR. Although they were able to resuscitate her, the baby girl passed away later that afternoon.

As the grieving parents tried to understand what had happened, they looked at the vial of medicine they had remaining. It said EPINEPHRINE. They realized Zoya had not been given vitamin K as they had thought. They later learned that the dose on the epinephrine bottle was dangerously high for a small baby like their little girl. Clinic staff told them that the vitamin K and epinephrine bottles were similar in size and colour and were easy to confuse.

Look-alike packaging is an ever-present danger in the dispensing of medicines. Health care providers should remain vigilant and follow protocols to ensure that similarly packed medicines are not confused.

A woman went to the pharmacy to fill prescriptions written by two different doctors for two different family members. One prescription was for her daughter, Mila, who was pregnant with her first child. The other was a high-dose cholesterol medication for her 60-year-old husband.

The pharmacist prepared the two medications and put a sticker with the patients name on each box. But he accidentally reversed the stickers, putting the fathers name on the daughters prescription and the daughters name on the cholesterol medication. Mila took the cholesterol medication at the high doses written on the label and lost her baby as a result.

It is important for pharmacists and patients to double-check to be sure there are no errors and that the medication the patient is taking is the one that has been prescribed.

*The names and photos used in this story are not real, but the story is based on true events.

A 54-year-old woman was given high doses of steroids to suppress her immune response and prevent organ rejection after a kidney transplant. After 3 months of heavy doses of steroids she began to pass stool through the vagina. She was seen by a multidisciplinary team consisting of a kidney transplant surgeon who was also the senior urologist, a nephrologist, a senior general surgeon, and an obstetrics and gynecology consultant.

The medical team asked the senior radiologist to do a pelvic MRI. His report revealed that the patient had developed an abnormal connection called a fistula, a passage between the bowel and female reproductive system. The radiologist believed this was due to the high steroid doses the patient had been taking and recommended decreasing the dose. A review of the patients medical record showed that the original doctor had miscalculated the steroid dose, resulting in overdose. Another doctor who also reviewed the case commented that fistulas can be among the side effects of this medicine when it is given at high doses. Several years after her transplant, the patient died of severe infection. .

Even if the fistula was not the direct result of her steroid medication, this patient received a dangerous overdose that was continued over a long period. It is important to calculate dosages carefully and to review them regularly for accuracy..

*The names and photos used in this story are not real, but the story is based on true events.

Oneida – Misdiagnosis leads to medication error

Oneida, a 13-year-old girl, began having spells of numbness in her arms and legs. A neurologist diagnosed her as having a rare form of migraine that caused numbing instead of headaches. He prescribed a drug in the triptan family, a class of drugs that alleviates migraine headaches by constricting the arteries.

Several days later, Oneida suffered a massive stroke that left her in a coma. After the stroke, doctors realized she had Moyamoya, a disease that causes narrowing and blockage in the arteries at the base of the brain. Her numb spells were not migraines, but mini-strokes. By constricting her arteries, the triptan had turned her mini-strokes into a full-blown stroke.

The medical team met with Oneidas mother and informed her that her child was brain-dead. Oneidas mother said she could not accept this. What do you want us to do? asked the doctors. Give her time, replied the mother. Two weeks later, Oneida opened her eyes. Two weeks after that, she regained full consciousness.

With intense physical therapy, Oneida slowly improved. After five months she was able to leave the hospital and return to school. Her mother quit her job and her brother gave up after-school activities to care for her. Family, friends, and even complete strangers chipped in to help the family survive financially. Nearly two years after the stroke, Oneida entered high school walking with only a leg brace. Although she still has severe disabilities, she has graduated from high school and enrolled in college.

The migraine drug this young girl had been given was labelled with clear warnings that it should not be taken by patients with a history of stroke or mini-strokes. Nothing had been done to rule out mini-strokes as a cause of her symptoms. It is important for health care providers to be certain they have the correct diagnosis before prescribing high-risk medications.

*The names and photos used in this story are not real, but the story is based on true events.

Jolene – Over-the-counter medications

A woman in her 80s, Jolene, went to the eye doctor because of reduced production of tears, which was causing pain and extreme sensitivity to light. The doctor diagnosed the problem as age-related dry eye and prescribed a medication to stimulate production of tears.

Jolenes daughter then discovered that her mother had been taking an over-the-counter antihistamine previously recommended by another doctor, although she did not have a serious problem with recurring allergies. Researching online, the daughter found information in the national library of medicine that linked the antihistamine to reduced tear production. Her mother discontinued both medications and her tear production returned to normal.

Families are important partners in medication reviews. There are thousands of medical conditions and thousands of drugs on the market, and doctors are not always in a position to consider every possibility for every patient. Research by patients and families, properly done, can help patients prepare to discuss with their doctors whether a symptom might be a drug side effect.

*The names and photos used in this story are not real, but the story is based on true events.

Mr Rahul – Safe medication use in the elderly

Mr Rahul – Safe medication use in the elderly Following a brief hospital stay, Mr Rahul, a 76-year-old man, was prescribed a diuretic for high blood pressure. Diuretics work by increasing urine flow and reducing the amount of water and salt in the body. Three weeks later, Mr Rahul developed a urinary tract infection and went to a different hospital for treatment. Medical staff there believed the infection had been caused by the diuretic, which has been associated with dehydration and urinary tract infections in the elderly. They sent Mr Rahul home with an antibiotic for his infection and prescribed a new blood pressure medicine, an ACE inhibitor, to replace the diuretic.

In addition to his high blood pressure, Mr Rahul had type 2 diabetes, which had been poorly controlled in the past. Along with the blood pressure medicine, he was prescribed insulin, an oral diabetes medicine, and a cholesterol medicine. As part of a community-based programme, pharmacists visited Mr Rahul at home and reviewed his medicines . They found that he was taking a double dose of his cholesterol medicine, and was keeping the insulin in a freezer compartment instead of the refrigerator. The blood pressure medicine made him feel faint and he had stopped taking it. He was also taking several unprescribed medicines and supplements, creating a possibility of drug interactions.

The health care team realized that Mr Rahul had been prescribed a higher starting dose of the blood pressure medicine than he should have had. All blood pressure drugs, especially ACE inhibitors like the one Mr Rahul was taking, can increase the risk of fainting, especially in elderly patients. Mr Rahuls fainting episodes might have been prevented by beginning with a low dose and gradually building up to the higher dose. His accidental overdosing on his cholesterol medicine had also led to unwanted side effects. Cholesterol medicines (statins) are prescribed to prevent heart attacks by lowering blood cholesterol, but in older people who have not experienced a heart attack the benefits of this are unclear. For the elderly, side effects such as muscle weakness may be of more concern than prevention of possible future heart attacks.

Prescribers are not always mindful enough of the fact that there are special considerations for medication use in the elderly. Detailed counselling of patients and visiting them in their home environments can help adjust medications to the individual and reveal misunderstandings that might prevent safe and effective use of medications.

*The names and photos used in this story are not real, but the story is based on true events.

How patients and families have brought about change

: WHOs Third Global Patient Safety Challenge

: WHOs Third Global Patient Safety Challenge

Veterinary Prescription Labels

Thermal Label Printer Cleaning Cards

Veterinary Prescription Bags and Tote Bags

Veterinary Tote Bags 12×15

Veterinary Tote Bags 9×12

Thermal Label Printer Cleaning Cards

Veterinary Prescription Bags and Tote Bags

Veterinary Tote Bags 12×15

Veterinary Tote Bags 9×12

Quantity pricing breaks at 3+ boxes. Note, quantity discounts do not apply to Sale items.We offer standard veterinary prescription labels to show whats inside a medicine bottle, but we also have products to label anything medicine-related at your clinic.

Prescription Labels for Different Uses

Bring attention to common side effects and controlled substances with our pre-printed veterinary prescription label stickers, and add general dosing information with our medication labels. Keep syringes organized with stickers for common contents including saline and anesthetics. Add a label to your I.V. bags to indicate the added medications. Filling a prescription that will be used with outdoor animals? We have label shields to make sure the drug information wont get smeared when exposed to the elements. Even the prescription labels themselves are available in several designs with warning and background graphics to help them stand out when stored near human medicines.

Our high-quality prescription labels for veterinarians offer clarity of printing and stick securely to drug containers, mailing cartons, and envelopes. Because the labels are compatible with Avimark, Complete Clinic, PAWS Practice, Vetstar, DVMAX, V-Tech, and IntraVet, and works with Dymo printer, they can be easily customized.

You can place your practice info, your logo, and any necessary edits to the content. You can then enhance your veterinary practices professional image and brand identity. The labels are also designed to run trouble-free through Dymo printers.

We even have a selection of blank, multi-purpose mailing labels for your convenience.

Choose from a variety of designs below. For your convenience, you may order online through this site and well ship the items within 24 hours.

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Professional pharmacy labels that are compatible with a variety of software including Avimark, DVMAX, PAWS Practice, …

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Professional pharmacy labels that are compatible with a variety of software including Avimark, DVMAX, PAWS Practice, …

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Professional pharmacy labels that are compatible with IDEXX Cornerstone, IDEXX Better Choice, IDEXX VPM, and other so…

Add To CartTL-45/I-200 Pharmacy Labels

Professional pharmacy labels that are compatible with IDEXX Cornerstone, IDEXX Better Choice, IDEXX VPM, and other so…

Add To CartTL-45/M-850 Pharmacy Labels

Professional pharmacy labels that are compatible with IDEXX Cornerstone, IDEXX Better Choice, IDEXX VPM, and other so…

Add To CartTL-50/BLANK Pharmacy Labels

Professional pharmacy labels that are compatible with Impromed Software. Works with Eltron printer. Label size: 3 1/2…

Add To CartTL-70/BLANK Pharmacy Labels

Professional pharmacy labels that are compatible with IDEXX Cornerstone, IDEXX Better Choice, IDEXX VPM, and other so…

Add To CartTL-70/I-200 Pharmacy Labels

Professional pharmacy labels that are compatible with IDEXX Cornerstone, IDEXX Better Choice, IDEXX VPM, and other so…

Pre-Order NowTL-70/M-850 Pharmacy Labels

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Add To CartTL-90 Eltron/Zebra Pharmacy Labels

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All prices are inUSD.© 2018 Positive ImpressionsSitemap

Certain tools are so good that usinghem would be considerean unfairdvantage

Top Pharmacy Software PioneerRx

Save + Revitalize Independent Pharmacy

Do anything you can to make the customer feel special, that theyre being taken care of, and that they are being looked at individually.

Do anything you can to make the customer feel special, that theyre being taken care of, and that they are being looked at individually.

In the past year, almost 40% of independent pharmacies who converted pharmacy software chose PioneerRx. Thats nearly double the sales of any other pharmacy system. Mic Drop

** 2017 Independent Pharmacy Survey Results

Certain tools are so good that using them would be considered an unfair advantage.

Get motivated to thrive as an independent pharmacy in a competitive world.

Of all the matters a pharmacist constantly worries about, pricing should never be one of them. Pharmacies that employ the PioneerRx pharmacy software have the ability to manage Pricing Schedules, which are structures that determine how much the patient will pay for the drug. Pricing Rules are set to determine what category patient, third party, facility, etc. the pricing applies to. Other features like Competitive Pricing allow you to see how the larger pharmacy chains are pricing their discounted drug programs so independent pharmacists can stay competitive.

Chris Cornelison of Iuka Drug andSaltillo Pharmacy & Solutionsrelies on the Pricing features in his pharmacy system to manage drug prices at his multiple locations, including his newest store, New Albany Pharmacy & Solutions. Chris handles a lot of high-volume generics that usually do not generate a high profit margin. I call these loss leaders, Chris explains. You wont make much money with these, so you cant price every drug like you would a loss leader. You need to adjust these prices, which is made possible by the Pricing features in PioneerRx. PioneerRx pharmacists are tackling all their Pricing needs with the help of their pharmacy technology.

Thanks to PioneerRxs pharmacy technology, patients have virtual access to their pharmacys services through a customized and brandedRxLocalmobile application that is free for Apple and Android devices. Once logged into the pharmacys RxLocal app, patients may submit refill requests, view their profiles and insurance information, and create medication reminders to help with adherence. RxLocal is also available as a custom website that digitizes the pharmacys refill services.Read More

PioneerRxs pharmacy technology allows for easy creation and management of customer accounts receivable. Among a variety of other uses, A/R Accounts allow pharmacies to provide patients with the option of making scheduled payments at a later date, organize charges for residents of long-term-care facilities, and bill delivery patients monthly. Features like auto pay, charge limits, and sub accounts are all included within A/R. When PioneerRx users need additional support with their accounts receivable or have other financial questions, they can always turn to the Accounting Support team for assistance.Read More

Reconciliation is the process of settling a customers third-party payment against third-party claims, which allows the customer to see what third-party claims are pending payment. Claim reconciliation is a major part of managing an independent pharmacy, and PioneerRx offers a complete suite of claim management tools within its pharmacy software system. The software downloads 835 remittance files and processes them overnight, and PioneerRxs Reconciliation Specialists handle files that cannot be processed completely because of claim fees, wrong check number, or wrong reconciliation account.Read More

Let us show you how PioneerRx can better your business

Pharmacy Software Features you are absolutely going to love…

Patient Health, Adherance & Medication Therapy Management (MTM)Tracking and coordinating your patients medications in your pharmacy software is even easier with built-in features on Adherence, Patient Risk, MTM and Med Sync.Integrated Medication Synchronization

Independent pharmacy leaders agree that the number one game changer in your pharmacy is to synchronize your patients medications. For the pharmacy, this provides a significant improvement in efficiency and inventory management. For the patient, medication synchronization can significantly improve adherence, convenience and overall customer satisfaction. Only the top pharmacy software systems have a medication synchronization program built into their work flow. Many others rely on third party add-ons that reduce efficiency and increase cost.

Want to learn more? Schedule a demo today and see how medication synchronization can transform your pharmacy

Integrated health information technology is bringing the pharmacy industry the opportunity to make a difference in total cost of care. The Patient Risk Score allows pharmacies to prove their value to payers by providing additional intervention with patients that are most at risk of serious health consequences.

Pharmacists using PioneerRx pharmacy computer software can identify the risk of individual patients being hospitalized in the next 30 days and next 12 months. This is based upon the patients medications and adherence. This Risk Scores are prominent throughout PioneerRxs comprehensive workflow. Medication Therapy Management (MTM) alerts are automatically generated for high risk patients and direct pharmacists to conduct interventions that may lead to improved patient outcomes.

The ability for a pharmacist to quickly analyze a patients adherence to all medications in their normal workflow is a feature included only in top pharmacy software. In PioneerRx, these numbers are shown and analyzed throughout the system and can be shown as medication therapy management (MTM) alerts. Advanced reporting capabilities allow this data to be easily searched, organized and exported in a variety of ways.

Unlike most other software packages and third-party add-ons, PioneerRx analyzes the data not only as a report card but in order to determine if action on the part of the pharmacy is warranted. These methods help account for patient hospitalizations and recent improvements in adherence which would affect overall numbers but would not require an intervention.

Improve patient outcomes and get paid for it by using OutcomesMTM and PioneerRx Pharmacy Software.  This system analyzes Medicare Part D patients and provides helpful TIPs (Targeted Intervention Programs) on patients who need intervention.  These TIPS are added right in your pharmacy management system.  Once the TIP is completed, your pharmacy records it with the OutcomesMTM web platform through direct links from the pharmacy system without having to log in to OutcomesMTM directly.

Deliver first-rate patient care with PioneerRx and Mirixa. Mirixa is a cost-effective Medication Therapy Management program that is available to all PioneerRx users and found directly inside the pharmacy systems workflow. With Mirixa, users can evaluate the prescription history of each patient and isolate those non-compliant patients with recommended MTM actions. Once the action is performed with the patient, your pharmacy will record those steps with Mirixa directly inside the pharmacy software. Mirixa will also financially compensate you for promoting long-term health and quality patient care within your pharmacy. Only the best pharmacy management software have this feature integrated directly in their system.

Do you want to increase patient adherence and compliance? With the help of PioneerRx Pharmacy Softwares top-notch programs and features, you can potentially boost your pharmacys CMS Five Star Rating by increasing patient adherence. Only the best pharmacy software companies are tracking this directly in the pharmacy system.

The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) aims to provide better care, healthier people and communities, and lower cost care.1In alignment with this goal, CMS developed a one to five star rating system used to evaluate the performance of Medicare Advantage plans. A plans star rating is significant because it directly affects their compensation and marketing advantages.

Medicare Advantage plans are rated on performance areas, including outcome measures (improvement in health), intermediate outcome measures, patient experience, access measures (barriers to care), and process measures (how care is provided).1

Part D plans are rated on performance measures for four domains: Drug Plan Customer Service, Member Complaints, Problems Getting Services, and Choosing to Leave the Plan, Member Experience with Drug Plan, and Drug Pricing and Patient Safety. The Drug Pricing and Patient Safety domain includes Pharmacy Quality Alliance (PQA)-supported medication adherence measures.2

CMS also uses Display Measures to further evaluate Part D plans. Although not included in the plans star ratings, these evaluations are reported to CMS and are displayed on the Patient Safety website.  PQA-supported measures of medication safety, including drug-drug interactions, excessive doses of oral diabetes medications, and completion rate of Comprehensive Medication Reviews, are measured and reported.2This is where pharmacies come in!

Data is collected detailing pharmacies performance in areas such as vaccinations, health coaching, medication therapy management, health promotion, care coordination, and adherence counseling.1Medicare Advantage plans are particularly focused on medication adherence for Part D patients receiving maintenance medications for diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension, and cholesterol.

Pharmacies performance evaluations could potentially determine whether a Medicare Advantage plan includes a pharmacy in a preferred network. Plans may seek pharmacies who support their goals and who are willing to work to boost their performance numbers, such as those related to medication adherence.

For pharmacies, this may be a prime opportunity to collaborate with Medicare Advantage plans to improve star ratings and ensure patients are receiving appropriate care.

The landscape of healthcare is evolving; in the future, pharmacies will play a growing role in providing comprehensive healthcare to their patients. We recommend you learn more about the CMS star-rating system and how your pharmacy is being evaluated.

With the PioneerRx Workflow Calendar you can quickly review your pharmacys workload in one convenient, easy-to-use location. This interactive calendar displays all prescriptions that are due for refill on each day of the month and can help the pharmacy identify compliance opportunities. Prescriptions are itemized by Regular Fills, Retail Sync Fills, Facility Cycle Fills, and also a grand total of all prescriptions. Selecting the various fill types will provide users with a detailed break-down per patient and display the workflow status of his/her prescriptions. Users can also save time by processing a patients outstanding Cycle Fills directly from the Workflow Calendar. With the calendars usefulReady %column, your staff can easily see how many prescriptions for each patient are ready for pick-up or delivery.

It is one of the best resources when planning workflow, scheduling staff coverage, or just adding new sync patients to your month. Pharmacies should use the Workflow Calendar to their advantage to maintain steady workflow progress and to ensure that prescriptions will be filled in a timely manner, optimizing the potential for better health outcomes. The Workflow Calendar is just one of the many built-in, time-saving tools that the PioneerRx Pharmacy Software offers to its customers.

Interested in providing your customers enhanced services? With PioneerRx, recording patient labs values has never been easier! Only the best pharmacy software system integrates lab value documentation directly into the patient profile.

PioneerRxs intuitive system will even notify users when a patients lab results are overdue by highlighting the lab in red on the patients profile and can automatically create an MTM action for that patient. This ensures that patients never miss scheduled lab work and serves to further improve patient wellness!

With PioneerRxs built-in patient notification option, you can send messages directly to your customers phone or email address when prescriptions are complete and ready for pickup, delivery, or shipment. More importantly, you can adjust the frequency of these messages for forgetful patients to remind them of their completed medications until they are picked up through the point of sale. IVR notifications are also available to pharmacies that have an account with an IVR company. VisitMarketplaceto see which IVR companies are integrated with our pharmacy software.

Many studies confirm that, on average, patients are five days late refilling their maintenance medications. Thats the equivalent of two missed refills per year. With integrated Automatic Refill options, your pharmacy can help improve your patients health and adherence scores.

Combine Automatic Refills and Patient Notifications for even better adherence practices. This is the pharmacy technology that helps you make more money and have more fun.

Rapid Data Entry and Enhanced Workflow

Who knew saving time could be so easy! With all the speed features PioneerRx can offer, you are sure to cut your time spent behind the computer.

In todays digital age, quick and easy access to your pharmacies documentation is crucial. PioneerRx not only includes the ability to receive faxes digitally, but also makes importing other files and documents a seamless processIng efficiency while at the same time, reduces clutter. Conveniently located in the PioneerRx Incoming Document Queue, you can review, edit, and categorize your documents and assign them to appropriate categories.

Every independent pharmacy is unique, and your workflows are no exception. The best pharmacy software systems incorporate features that allow you to customize your workflow to achieve optimal efficiency. The PioneerRx Intake Queue allows you to divide and conquer patients prescriptions while balancing workload. By scanning images in advance and assigning them to a patients profile, you can then complete data entry at an alternate workstation of your choosing.

With the PioneerRx Pre-Check station, a pharmacist has the ability to review each new prescription for potential data entry errors prior to third-party adjudication. This optional step of workflow can save both time and money by eliminating re-adjudication due to error, as well as the need to reprint incorrect labels. For pharmacies offering strip packaging, this integrated feature gives a pharmacist the opportunity to review data entry before data is passed to their device.

Hard copy image scanning is no longer optional. Only the best pharmacy software systems include this feature at no additional cost and incorporate it directly into your custom workflow. By using this integrated feature, you can scan and tie the prescription right in your pharmacy system. Link images to prescriptions, patients, items, third parties, facilities, compound and even physicians. These documents are always accessible on any workstation. While none of us look forward to an audit, PioneerRx provides you with peace of mind because all images are readily available in a clear and concise manner and can easily be exported to the report of your choosing.

As the pharmacy industry continues to rapidly evolve and change, so too must your pharmacys workflow. PioneerRx, the top pharmacy software system, can help keep you ahead of the competition by providing a truly customizable workflow solution that is built directly into your new pharmacy management system. Our custom-tailored, and fully integrated approach to workflow, allows your pharmacy to work smarter, faster, and safer. Youre independent for a reason. Let PioneerRx help you design a workflow that meets your pharmacys unique, and independent needs.

With the PioneerRx Pharmacy Software System, everything you need is a keystroke or mouse click away. When utilizing the integrated hard copy scanning feature, document management is quick and painless. Effortlessly link documents to prescriptions, patients, prescribers, items, suppliers, employees, third parties, facilities and so much more.

How fast can you add a patient into your new pharmacy management system? With PioneerRx, its the click of a button! 2D Barcode Technology makes populating a new patient profile or updating and replacing outdated patient information easier than ever before. Simply scan the barcode of your patients 2D enabled ID PioneerRx will automatically load many of the necessary fields.

PioneerRx allows you to seamlessly add or update prescribers from the National Provider Registry and DEA database all within your pharmacy system. By keeping it in inside your system, you keep the workflow moving for faster dispensing of the patients medication.

With our pharmacy software, PioneerRx, you will have advanced capabilities for importing and viewing eScripts. These tweaks inside the system will improve the workflow of your pharmacy by prepopulating fields with the eScripts data with no need to open multiple windows.

PioneerRx was also one of the first out to the market with integrated EPCS requirements, so your pharmacy is eligible to receive controlled substances directly in your fill request queue.

PioneerRx was one of the first on the market to integrate CoverMyMeds directly into the pharmacy systems workflow. CoverMyMeds is a free service that provides instant access to Prior Authorization (PA) forms for all Medicare Part D plans, Medicaid plans, and most commercial insurance plans. CoverMyMeds will process rejections due to Product/Service Not Covered, Prior Authorization Required, and Plan Limitations Exceeded. Within minutes, the correct prior authorization is found and can be completed online with data automatically pulled from our pharmacy system. This form is then faxed or sent electronically to the physicians office for speedy completion.

Wow your customers by filling their prescriptions faster. What once took days to get PA forms back now takes hours with the use of CoverMyMeds.

Dont worry about patients not having their insurance card when dropping off their prescriptions. With our Medicare and Insurance Lookup feature in PioneerRx, you can quickly and easily search for the patients third party information. All you need is their name, DOB, gender, social security number, and zip code to find them in our third party eligibility check program. How easy is that?

Will Call functionality is a crucial part of a pharmacys workflow. By scanning prescriptions into the PioneerRx Will Call system, you add efficiency and accuracy to the checkout process.

PioneerRx Pharmacy Software features an Easy Bagging solution. With Easy Bagging, simply scan each item on the bag, then scan into the appropriate will call bin. At the point of sale, the clerk can quickly scan any of the barcodes in the bag to bring up all the items.

To ensure that your customers leave with all their prescriptions, Rx Notifications are available at the PioneerRx POS. When a sale is totaled, the POS clerk can be alerted if the patient (or any patients at that same address) have additional prescriptions ready or in progress. You can stay on top of your patients prescriptions and save them a potential trip to the pharmacy.

Automatically bill the primary and secondary third parties directly within the pharmacy system. With PioneerRx, once you submit a transmitted claim, the third party will return a response right back. This is information can all be found back in the pharmacy system.

Prior Authorization has never been easier. PioneerRx works with CoverMyMeds to alleviate frustrations and streamline the PA process. Pharmacists are a click or keystroke away from sending data seamlessly from their PioneerRx system to CoverMyMeds where a third party-specific prior authorization form to can be sent to the directly to the prescriber.

When combined with our industry leading Accounting Support, PioneerRx helps you manage your pharmacys A/R or Charge accounts with ease. Accounts are integrated into the patients profile and work just like a credit card. From setting up customer auto pay to managing spending limits, authorized users, categories, sub accounts and so much more, the PioneerRx Pharmacy System provides your pharmacys A/R solution at no additional cost.

Are you being paid correctly by third parties? PioneerRx lets you keep all of your financials in one convenient location. The Reconciliation of Third Party claims via 835 files makes it easier than ever to manage your pharmacys books.

All available 835 remit files are automatically downloaded and reconciled overnight when payments match the details on the file. PioneerRx personnel handles files that cannot be processed completely because of claim fees, wrong check number, or wrong reconciliation account. Those payments covered by other manual remittances are handled and reconciled manually by the store. As always, the store is responsible for posting all payments in PioneerRx.

Contact our accounting department at 1- to learn more!

Prescription DIR fees have quickly become a heated point of contention within the pharmacy industry. Rest assured, PioneerRxs pharmacy technology has the tools to protect your independent pharmacy from this growing problem. With this pharmacy management system, you can quickly and easily identify losses on a prescription due to a Third Partys DIR fees!

PioneerRx makes it simple to load the DIR percentage or dollar amount directly into each Third Partys profile. That DIR fee will then be applied to every prescription where that Third Party is selected as the pay method.

PioneerRx Pharmacy Software readily displays the value of the DIR fee in the Gross Profit section of the prescriptions pricing information and alerts the user when the prescription dips into a negative Gross Profit due to the applied DIR fee. This helps pharmacies identify where the loss is coming from, so they can determine how to best proceed with the prescription.

From the start, PioneerRx Pharmacy Software changed the game when we became the first pharmacy software system to provide integrated Pre/Post Edit functionality. These Edits are designed to save your pharmacy money and prevent mistakes from walking out the door. Since both of these are important to your success, PioneerRx has included these feature at no extra charge. While other software vendors sometimes offer this service with claim switching, you may be charged as much as seven cents per fill, which quickly adds up.

PioneerRxs Pre/Post Edit solution allows to you fill with speed, efficiency and the peace of mind of knowing that costly errors can be addressed and prevented before its too late.

Pre-Editis an evaluation of the prescription data before it is sent in order to determine items that need to be corrected.Post Editis an evaluation of the claim data after it is adjudicated. You decide whether to reject, review, or ignore each type of Rx Edit issue.

Here are some examples of how you can use Pre/Post Edits in your Pharmacy.

Pharmacy contracts are typically based uponAWP X%+ Fee  orMAC+ Fee. The non-fee version (underlined) is called the Basis. If a pharmacy transmits a claim with a basis less than their contract, the third party will typically pay the reduced amount. If this occurs, a Basis Limited post edit will be triggered.

With PioneerRx you can make more money by finding and correcting pricing mistakes that cause Basis Limited claims.

Pharmacy contracts typically limit reimbursement to the minimum of the contracted amount or the pharmacys Usual & Customary (Cash) price. The Cash price is transmitted with the claim. If this limits the third party payment, a Cash Limited post edit will be triggered.

Use this handy post edit to find and correct pricing mistakes that cause Cash Limited claims.

If a generic is available and a brand is dispensed without a reason provided, many pharmacy contracts will reduce reimbursement to the contract amount for the generic. Dispensing a brand when a generic is available will trigger a DAW Code pre/post edit, if a DAW code isnt selected.

One Texas pharmacy converted to PioneerRx and found that they had been being cut back $800 per fill on a drug in their previous system due to this issue. PioneerRx found the problem, and they were able to fix the prescription.

If an item that should not normally be broken down (Vial, Tube, etc) is filled with an incompatible dispensed size, Package Size pre/post edits are triggered. Filling with the wrong size can cause a significant loss of profit and possibly trigger an audit.

The average pharmacy makes an additional $100-$400 a month when these errors are corrected.

Third Party Remitted a Negative Amount (Post Edit)

Some third party plans are simply discount plans with 100% copay. Many charge the pharmacy for the privilege of accepting this plan. The third party sends the pharmacy a bill for these amounts. If a prescription returns a negative remitted amount where the pharmacy would owe a third party for filling a script, a Third Party Negative Remitted Amount post edit is triggered. Then, simply switch the prescription to cash or another discount plan that does not include a negative remitted amount.

Avoid paying unnecessary third party fees.

If an item is dispensed with an expired NDC, a pre/post edit is triggered. Inadvertently using a wrong or expired NDC could reduce your reimbursement and possibly trigger an audit.

By using this Rx edit, you could be preventing obsolete NDCs from ever being submitted.

Dispensing Item Out of Stock (Pre/Post Edit)

Keeping a perpetual inventory is a challenge in many pharmacy systems due to the dispensed item changing on refills. PioneerRx makes it easy with Dispensed Item Out of Stock pre/post edits.

If the gross profit on a prescription is less than the minimum percent or dollar value set by the pharmacy, a Low Profit post edit will be triggered. In addition,Smart Profit Rejectallows the pharmacy to include consideration of rebates and the last cost paid for the item before prompting a Low Profit post edit.

If patient identification, such as a drivers license or social security number, is required due to the schedule of the dispensed item and it has not been entered, Patient ID Missing pre/post edits are triggered.

Patient Information Missing (Pre/Post Edit)

If the patients allergy, other medications, and/or medical conditions are missing or out of date and a prescription is filled, Patient Information Missing pre/post edits are triggered.

Missing or Invalid DEA (Pre/Post Edit)

If a prescriber with a missing or invalid DEA is attached to a prescription, and the DEA number is required due to the dispensed item, Missing or Invalid DEA pre/post edits are triggered.

The pharmacy can define a high copay amount in location options. If a copay is higher than the amount defined, the pharmacy may choose to verify that the patient wants the item before it is filled. If a claim is adjudicated with a copay that exceeds this amount, a High Copay post edit is triggered.

If the secondary third party returns with a higher copay amount than the primary, a Higher Secondary Copay post edit is triggered. Misconfigured coupons or third party settings typically cause this error.

Missing or Invalid DPS (Pre/Post Edit) Texas

If a prescriber with a missing or invalid DPS is attached to a prescription, and the DPS number is required due to the dispensed item, Missing or Invalid DPS pre/post edits are triggered.

If only correcting a patients birthday when a third party had it wrong was as simple as a few clicks of the mouse. With top pharmacy software systems like PioneerRx, that wish is a reality. Claim Overrides allow you to submit the data they require without overwriting and compromising accurate information within a patients profile.

Have you ever been curious as to how other pharmacies are cash pricing?

PioneerRx has the solution. Included within your new Pharmacy Software System is the ability to review a statistical data analysis of cash and third-party pricing from other pharmacies across the country. With this tool at your disposal, you can confidently and competitively price all your cash prescriptions. No blind pricing. No costly add-on services.

Third parties base a pharmacys contracts upon some form of manufacturers price. When a manufacturer increases their price, many third parties experience a delay in obtaining and entering the new information into their systems.

When this situation occurs, the pharmacy may not receive the correct amount of payment. In order to receive this amount, the claim must be re-billed to the third party within the window for claims resubmission. Because some claims may not be reversed, oftentimes pharmacies experience losses when attempting to resubmit the claim.

AWP Rebilling works to address this problem by absorbing the risk of the reversed transaction. Ov

Medication – Refusal to Take

Your child refuses to take a medicine

Techniques for giving liquid medicines, pills and capsules

Wrong Technique For Giving Medicine Can Cause Vomiting

Forcing a struggling child to take any medicine can lead to vomiting or choking.

Using a better technique can sometimes get rid of the childs resistance.

Doctors can sometimes replace a bad-tasting antibiotic with a better-tasting one. Another option might be to give an antibiotic in a shot.

Most non-prescription medicines are not needed and can be stopped.

Good Technique for Giving Liquid Medicine

Equipment: Plastic medication syringe or dropper (not a spoon)

Childs position: Sitting up (Never lying down)

Place the syringe beyond the teeth or gumline. Some young children become cooperative if you let them hold the syringe. Have them place it in their own mouth. Then all you have to do is push the plunger.

Goal: Slowly drip or pour the medicine onto the back of the tongue. You can also aim for the pouch inside the cheek.

Do not squirt the medicine into the back of the throat. (Reason: Can enter windpipe and cause choking.)

If Your Child Does Not Cooperate: More Techniques For Giving Liquid Medicine

Caution: Never use this technique if the medicine is not needed.

If your child will not cooperate, you will often need 2 adults.

One adult will hold the child sitting on their lap. Their hands will hold the childs hands and head to keep from moving.

The other adult will give the medicine using the technique below:

You must have a medication syringe. You can get one at a pharmacy without a prescription.

Use one hand to hold the syringe. Use the other to open your childs mouth.

Open your childs mouth by pushing down on the chin. You can also run your finger inside the cheek and push down on the lower jaw.

Insert the syringe between the teeth. Drip the medicine onto the back of the tongue.

Keep the mouth closed until your child swallows. Gravity can help if you have your child in an upright position. Caution: Swallowing cannot occur if the head is bent backward.

Afterward, say: Im sorry we had to hold you. If you help next time, we wont have to.

Give your child a hug. Also, use other positive rewards (treat, special DVD or stickers).

Liquid Medicines: How to Measure the Dose

Use the oral dosing syringe that comes with the medicine. This device gives the most accurate dosing.

If you dont have a med syringe, buy one at a pharmacy.

Dosing with syringe is more accurate than a measuring cup or teaspoon.

Household spoons vary in the volume they hold.

Risk: Using household spoons causes thousands of cases of poisoning each year.

When to Call for Medication – Refusal to Take

Refuses to take a prescription medicine. Using a good technique from Care Advice has not helped.

You think your child needs to be seen, and the problem is urgent

You think your child needs to be seen, but the problem is not urgent

Refuses to take a non-prescription medicine advised by your childs doctor. Using a good technique from Care Advice has not helped.

You have other questions or concerns

Prescription liquid medicine and your child refuses to take it

Non-prescription liquid medicine and your child refuses to take it

Techniques for giving liquid medicine to cooperative child

Techniques for giving pills or capsules

Seattle Childrens Urgent Care Locations

If your childs illness or injury is life-threating, call 911.

Prescription Liquid Medicine and Your Child Refuses To Take It

What You Should Know About Medicine Refusal:

Young children dont understand the importance of taking a medicine.

Good technique can make a big difference.

Here is some care advice that should help.

Sweeteners For Medicines That Taste Bad:

Most liquid medicines have a good or at least acceptable flavor.

If your child complains about the taste, your job is to mask it.

Mix the dose of medicine with a strong-sweet flavor. You can try chocolate syrup, strawberry syrup, or any pancake syrup. You can also use Kool-Aid powder.

Medicines can safely be mixed with any flavor your child likes.

Usually 1 teaspoon (5 ml) of the sweetener will do.

Also, have a glass of your childs favorite drink ready to rinse the mouth.

Tip: Coating the taste buds with the sweetener first may also hide the taste.

Good Technique for Giving Liquid Medicine:

Equipment: Plastic medication syringe or dropper (not a spoon)

Childs position: Sitting up (Never lying down)

Place the syringe beyond the teeth or gumline. Some young children become cooperative if you let them hold the syringe. Have them place it in their own mouth. Then all you have to do is push the plunger.

Goal: Slowly drip or pour the medicine onto the back of the tongue. You can also aim for the pouch inside the cheek.

Do not squirt medicine into the back of the throat. Reason: Can enter windpipe and cause choking.

If Child Does Not Cooperate – More Techniques for Giving Liquid Medicine:

Caution: Never use this technique if the medicine is not needed.

If your child will not cooperate, you will often need 2 adults.

One adult will hold the child sitting on their lap. Their hands will hold the childs hands and head to keep from moving.

The other adult will give the medicine using the technique below:

You must have a medication syringe. You can get one at a pharmacy without a prescription.

Use one hand to hold the syringe. Use the other to open your childs mouth.

Open your childs mouth by pushing down on the chin. You can also run your finger inside the cheek and push down on the lower jaw.

Insert the syringe between the teeth. Drip the medicine onto the back of the tongue.

Keep the mouth closed until your child swallows. Gravity can help if you have your child in an upright position. Caution: Swallowing cannot occur if the head is bent backward.

Afterward, say: Im sorry we had to hold you. If you help next time, we wont have to.

Give your child a hug. Also, use other positive rewards (treat, special DVD or stickers).

You cant get your child to take the medicine

You think your child needs to be seen

Non-Prescription Liquid Medicine and Your Child Refuses To Take It

What You Should Know About OTC Medicine Refusal:

Most non-prescription medicines (OTC) are not needed.

Examples of these non-essential medicines are most cough and cold medicines. Fever medicines are also not essential for most fevers.

Never try to force your child to take a medicine that is not needed.

Most often, symptoms can be helped with other types of treatment. See the specific topic that covers your childs main symptom for other treatment options.

Fevers only need to be treated with medicine if they cause discomfort. Most often, that means fevers above 102 F (39 C). Fevers less than 102 F (39 C) are important for fighting infections.

They can be treated with acetaminophen suppositories (such as FeverAll). The rectal dose is the same as the dose given by mouth.

Other options. If your child spits out or refuses ibuprofen, try oral acetaminophen (such as Tylenol). You can also try a different flavor or brand of the medicine. Other flavors or brands may taste better. If your child is old enough, you might also try chewable tablets. They may taste better than the liquid.

For all fevers: Keep your child well hydrated. Give lots of cold fluids.

Good Technique for Giving Liquid Medicine:

Equipment: Plastic medication syringe or dropper (not a spoon)

Childs position: Sitting up (Never lying down)

Place the syringe beyond the teeth or gumline. Some young children become cooperative if you let them hold the syringe. Have them place it in their own mouth. Then all you have to do is push the plunger.

Goal: Slowly drip or pour the medicine onto the back of the tongue. You can also aim for the pouch inside the cheek.

Do not squirt medicine into the back of the throat. Reason: Can enter windpipe and cause choking.

You think your child needs to be seen

Techniques for Giving Liquid Medicine to Cooperative Child

Sweeteners For Medicines That Taste Bad:

Most liquid medicines have a good or at least acceptable flavor.

If your child complains about the taste, your job is to mask it.

Mix the dose of medicine with a strong-sweet flavor. You can try chocolate syrup, strawberry syrup, or any pancake syrup. You can also use Kool-Aid powder.

Medicines can safely be mixed with any flavor your child likes.

Usually 1 teaspoon (5 ml) of the sweetener will do.

Also, have a glass of your childs favorite drink ready to rinse the mouth.

Tip: Coating the taste buds with the sweetener first may also hide the taste.

Good Technique for Giving Liquid Medicine:

Equipment: Plastic medication syringe or dropper (not a spoon)

Childs position: Sitting up (Never lying down)

Place the syringe beyond the teeth or gumline. Some young children become cooperative if you let them hold the syringe. Have them place it in their own mouth. Then all you have to do is push the plunger.

Goal: Slowly drip or pour the medicine onto the back of the tongue. You can also aim for the pouch inside the cheek.

Do not squirt medicine into the back of the throat. Reason: Can enter windpipe and cause choking.

You have other questions or concerns

Techniques for Giving Pills or Capsules

What You Should Know About Giving Pills or Capsules:

Many children have trouble swallowing pills or capsules.

Fortunately, most medicines also come in a liquid form.

Call your childs doctor if you arent successful with these tips for swallowing pills. Ask about the possibility of a liquid or chewable form of the medicine.

Tips for Swallowing Pills or Capsules:

Use a thicker fluid than water. Juices or smoothies are good. Its always harder to swallow pills with water. Place the pill or capsule far back on the tongue. Then, have your child fill the mouth with fluid. Have your child try to swallow large gulps at a time. The pill should disappear from the mouth.

Keep the head in a neutral or slightly bent forward position. Its difficult to swallow if the head is bent backward.

Drinking quickly through a straw can also help.

For easier swallowing, one approach is to split the pill into halves or quarters.

Another approach is to convert the pill to a powder. Crush the pill between two spoons. Crushing is made easier by wetting the pill with a few drops of water. Let it soften for 5 minutes.

Mix the crushed pill with a pancake syrup, chocolate syrup, or yogurt. You can also use any sweet food that doesnt require any chewing.

Note: You can do this with most pills. However, dont do this with slow-release or enteric-coated pills. Check with your doctor if you are unsure what you can do.

Slow-release capsules can be emptied. Just make sure the contents are swallowed without chewing.

These capsules often contain medicines with a bitter taste. So, the contents need to be mixed with a sweet food. Applesauce or yogurt may work.

If your child is over age 8 and unable to swallow pills, he should practice. Practice this skill when hes not sick or cranky. Some children cant swallow pills until age 10.

Start with small pieces of candy or ice and progress to M&Ms. Try to use substances that will melt quickly if they get stuck. If necessary, coat them with butter first.

Once candy pellets are mastered, pills can often be managed as well.

Your child cant take the medicine after trying these good techniques

You think your child needs to be seen

And remember, contact your doctor if your child develops any of the Call Your Doctor symptoms.

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. It is provided for educational purposes only. You assume full responsibility for how you choose to use this information.

Copyright 1994-2017 Schmitt Pediatric Guidelines LLC. All rights reserved.

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